Gay motorcycle clubs celebrated

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Coll2013-055 Blue Max Motorcycle Club records

Five Blue Max Motorcycle Club members in uniform jackets and Pickelhauben helmets seated on Harley Davidson Electra Glide motorcycles at curb in Glendale, California, c. 1970 | One/USC Archive | 17033

An exhibition opening at the ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives, “Sprayed with Tears”, delves into the history of Southern California’s gay motorcycle clubs. These were popular underground clubs throughout the 1960s and ’70s. Some of them that are active today.

Using material from the ONE Archives, artist collective Die Kränken focuses on one of these clubs, Blue Max, and re-stages a performance that took place there annually between 1968 and 1993: “The Rose of No Man’s Land,” where a World War I fighter pilot is nursed back to health by a Red Cross nurse, played by a club member in drag.

There will also be a video of the Black Pipe, an LA gay leather bar that was raided by the police in 1972, and a display of screen-printed handkerchiefs that were used for the “hanky code,” a surreptitious method of communicating sexual desire by placing color-coded handkerchiefs in one’s rear pants pocket.

The Satyrs Motorcycle Club are thought to be the “oldest running gay men’s motorcycle club” in the world, dating back to 1954.

The ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives is at the USC Libraries, 909 West Adams Blvd, University Park, Los Angeles.

http://hyperallergic.com/357473/an-exhibition-mines-the-history-of-socals-gay-motorcycle-clubs/


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Tim Campbell

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Tim Campbell | Uncredited | 16016

Gay History is sad to learn of the passing of long-time activist Tim Campbell, the former editor of the GLC Voice newspaper, who died on Dec. 26, 2015 at a hospice in Houston, Texas. He was 76 and had fought a short battle with aggressive cancer.

Confrontational in approach at times, in the 1980s he was one of the few openly gay men who would get back to reporters on issues ranging from the AIDS crisis to gay bathhouses and the annual Pride Festival. He and former Minneapolis City Council Member Barbara Carlson almost came to fisticuffs on several occasions. He was fearless in his arguments with police, and once took a swing with his briefcase at a member of the Minneapolis vice squad after the officer called him “Timmy.”

He will be remembered for bringing a cream pie to an AIDS task force meeting, and dressing as a campy Lady Liberty to protest the Rev. Jerry Falwell.

“He was the queen of guerrilla theater,” his longtime friend Dean Amundson said.

The Star-Tribune notes that

Campbell was tireless in his coverage of HIV/AIDS and promotion of safe sex. He advocated for gay marriage long before same-sex civil unions were even recognized by employers.

Campbell founded the GLC Voice in 1979 after working for a short-lived newspaper called Positively Gay. Every two weeks over the paper’s 13-year run, 10,000 copies of the GLC Voice were distributed on college campuses, in gay bars and sex-oriented bookstores and in street racks.

He never made money on the venture and said half-jokingly that he “earned a starving.”

His activism goes back more than 40 years. In 1973-74, Campbell joined with Jack Baker and Mike McConnell, the pioneering advocates of gay marriage, to conduct seminars in sensitivity training on gay issues for students, police, drug counsellors and business people. He advocated for news organizations to use “gay” and “lesbian” rather than “homosexual.”

When he retired 10 years ago he returned to Texas and immediately took up advocacy for his retirement community.

Gay History sends condolences to Mr. Campbell’s family, friends and colleagues.

http://www.startribune.com/longtime-gay-activist-and-publisher-of-glc-voice-tim-campbell-dies-at-76/364082401/

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Anthony Turney

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Anthony Turney | Bucks Herald | 14069

The Venerable Anthony Turney died on July 4 in a San Francisco hospice at the age of 76, after three years battling cancer.

Born Anthony Hipkin in Sutton, England, in 1937, he was adopted aged four by Sidney and Ida Turney, who lived in Aylesbury. He joined the army at 17 and was a ceremonial guard outside Buckingham Palace before he emigrated to the United States in 1968.

He spent time in St Louis, Atlanta and Washington DC before settling in San Francisco. When his partner Jimmy Brambaugh died from Aids in 1992 he completed a panel in the Aids Quilt. He was appointed CEO of the Names Project Foundation and in just three years transported 42,000 panels of the quilt to the National Mall in Washington DC, where they were seen by 1.2 million people.

Gay Activist sends condolences to family, friends and colleagues.

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