Gay marriage is good for us!

Legalizing same-sex marriage improved the health of gay men according to a new study in the US. Researchers from Vanderbilt University found that gay men had an easier time gaining access to health care and better health outcomes in states where same-sex marriage was legal.

This study showed that marriage equality in all 50 states improved health care access for men in same-sex relationships.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5948135/Legalizing-sex-marriage-improved-access-health-care-gay-men.html

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Court strengthens gay partners rights in EU

Today the European Court of Justice ruled that countries in the European Union where gay marriage is not yet legal must still offer same sex spouses the same residency rights as heterosexual couples under Brussels’ freedom of movement laws.

A country could not use the illegality of homosexual marriage as a reason to stop an EU citizen bringing their non-EU spouse to live with them, which is a right guaranteed by Brussels.

“Although the member states have the freedom whether or not to authorise marriage between persons of the same sex, they may not obstruct the freedom of residence of an EU citizen by refusing to grant his same-sex spouse, a national of a country that is not an EU Member State, a derived right of residence in their territory.”

The decision does not force EU members to recognise gay marriage, in a bid to prevent accusation that the Luxembourg court is meddling in national affairs.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/06/05/top-eu-court-rules-same-sex-spouses-have-rights-countries-have/

Time to change, say Northern Ireland gays and friends

Peter Morrison/Press Association | r

Thousands of activists marched through Belfast at the weekend demanding the reform of the petition of concern that has blocked any law change to allow gay marriage. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom which does now allow gay marriage.

They insisted that any deal to restore power-sharing in Stormont must include an end to the ban on gay marriage in Northern Ireland.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jun/02/activists-call-for-end-to-ban-on-gay-marriage-in-northern-ireland

Psst! Anyone want a third class marriage? Going cheap

The future of civil partnerships is in doubt following the introduction of same-sex marriage. A Supreme Court case begins on Monday which aims to open them up to heterosexual couples. Currently only same sex couples can have a civil partnership.

The Equalities Office now plans to consult on whether there is still enough demand among same-sex couples to retain civil partnerships since gay marriage was introduced in 2014.

While an average 6,300 civil partnerships were registered each year between 2007 and 2013, the number fell to 890 in 2016, and only 861 were registered in 2015.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/05/13/civil-partnerships-could-scrapped-numbers-plummet-following/

Elisa and Marcela

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Elisa and Marcela on their wedding day | José Sellier | 18306

A new film is being made about Elisa Sánchez Loriga and Marcela Gracia Ibeas who married in 1901 – the only known same-sex marriage in the history of the Spanish Catholic Church.

The historian Narciso de Gabriel, who wrote a book about the couple, says the pair were posted to village schools just a few miles apart in rural Galicia, close enough for Elisa to walk to Marcela’s house every evening after classes.

Posing in short hair and a morning suit as “Mario”, Elisa was duly baptised and married to Marcela.

Mr De Gabriel told the Spanish newspaper El Mundo in 2011 that the “wedding still stands as legal” in A Coruña’s civil register.

They didn’t get away with it. They spent the rest of their lives on the run from persecution across two continents.

Their story is to be made into a film by Isabel Coixet.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-43057841

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Australia gay marriage postal vote

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Uncredited photographer | Undated | Getty Images | 17166gh.jpg

In 2017, the Australian government authorised a national voluntary survey to determine the level of support for legalising same-sex marriage. The survey was held via the postal service between 12 September and 7 November 2017. The survey asked the question “Should the law be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry?”

A number of pressure groups, some personalities, and some of the media including “The Age”, campaigned vigorously first to stop the survey going ahead, and then to try to persuade people to reject gay marriage.

There were two legal challenges in the Australian High Court about the survey.

Shelley Argent, of Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, and Felicity Marlowe, of Rainbow Families) and independent MP Andrew Wilkie went to the High Court on 9 August 2017 to seek a temporary injunction. The survey was also challenged in the High Court by Australian Marriage Equality and Greens Senator Janet Rice. The High Court found that the survey was lawful.

A 17-year-old boy who was excluded from voting challenged that with the Australian Human Rights Commission. About 50,000 Australians aged 16 and 17 were registered on the electoral roll to vote. The boy dropped his complaint on 22 September after legal advice.

The survey returned 7,817,247 (61.6%) “Yes” responses and 4,873,987 (38.4%) “No” responses. An additional 36,686 (0.3%) responses were unclear and the total turnout was 12,727,920 (79.5%).

The Liberal–National Coalition government had pledged to facilitate a private member’s bill to legalise same-sex marriage in the Parliament in the event of a “Yes” outcome.

Many same-sex marriage proponents were critical of the postal survey, viewing it as a costly delay and legally redundant to holding a conscience vote on same-sex marriage in the parliament.

As with the Brexit vote in Britain, there was a rush of people registering to vote; by 24 August 2017, the closing date for new registrations, 98,000 new voters had added themselves to the roll. Survey forms were mailed out during two weeks commencing 12 September 2017. They were required to be returned for counting by 27 October 2017.

The Australian Parliament both passed the gay marriage law on 7 December 2017.

https://marriagesurvey.abs.gov.au/

Updated 8 December 2017

A day in May

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Easons | 16215gh

Veteran Irish journalist Charlie Bird has just published his new book “A day in May” about the historic referendum last year in the Republic of Ireland which paved the way for gay marriage.

The book chronicles the lead-up to the historic Marriage Equality referendum last May.

The book includes 50 powerful interviews with members of the LGBT community in Ireland and their family and friends, which was inspired by his involvement chairing the ‘Yes Campaign’ in last year’s referendum.

http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/television/tv-news/charlie-bird-labels-himself-one-of-the-most-heterosexual-men-in-the-world-ahead-of-marriage-next-week-34692560.html

http://www.easons.com/p-4254000-day-in-may.aspx

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