We Were Here documents the impact of HIV Aids on San Francisco’s gay community

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A participant at an HIV/AIDS demonstration | Undated | Unknown location | Marie Ueda | 14429

David Weissman has released his new documentary film “We Were Here,” a documentary profiling the earliest days of the HIV/Aids Crisis at its epicenter, San Francisco. Your Activist has seen a trailer for the film and the trailer is impressive – so here it is, below.

“The disease ravaged the city and its gay-popular Castro St. neighborhoods. By 1979, one “We Were Here” interviewee estimates, close to 10 percent of the city’s gay population was already infected with HIV. By the time HIV tests became possible near the mid-1980s, nearly 50 percent or more of the city’s gay men had already been infected”,

writes Go Q Notes.

Weissman remarks:

“I remember the very first article in Bay Area Reporter. In April 1981, there was a cluster of rare cancer found among gay men. In June of that year, another article originating from the Centers for Disease Control saying a cluster of rare pnuemonia had been found among gay men. So, I saw the very first press on it. I also remember seeing those photographs posted on the Star Pharmacy on Castro St. So, I was aware from the very beginning.”


SP

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2 thoughts on “We Were Here documents the impact of HIV Aids on San Francisco’s gay community

  1. I became aware of HIV/AIDS in 1979 because a friend in Chicago had it and died 2 years later. No one knew what it was. He told his Drs. to try whatever they could on him to find a cure. From that point on, I lost friends left, right and center who had contracted it. I’ve walked for all my friends in the AIDS walks over the years and know how many amazing people we’ve lost so young! Keep up your work, it is worth it.
    I lived in SF for 2 yrs. and know Marie Ueda and her work. She has also made a difference.

    Like

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